Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

  •  One of the most common knee injuries is an anterior cruciate ligament sprain or tear.

  •  Athletes who participate in high-demand sports like soccer, football, and basketball are more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligaments.

  •  If you have injured your anterior cruciate ligament, you may require surgery to regain the full function of your knee. This will depend on several factors, such as the severity of your injury and your activity level.

Anatomy

  • Three bones meet to form your knee joint: your thighbone (femur), shinbone (tibia), and kneecap (patella). Your kneecap sits in front of the joint to provide some protection.

  • Bones are connected to other bones by ligaments. There are four primary ligaments in your knee. They act like strong ropes to hold the bones together and keep your knee stable.

 

Collateral Ligaments

  • These are observed on the sides of your knee. The medial collateral ligament is on the inner and the lateral collateral ligament is on the outdoor. They manage the sideways movement of your knee and brace it against the uncommon motion.

Cruciate Ligaments

  • These are observed interior your knee joint. They cross each other to shape an "X" with the anterior cruciate ligament in front and the posterior cruciate ligament in the lower back. The cruciate ligaments manage the backward and forward movement of your knee.

  • These are found inside your knee joint. They cross each other to form an "X" with the anterior cruciate ligament in front and the posterior cruciate ligament in the back. The cruciate ligaments control the back and forth motion of your knee.

  • The anterior cruciate ligament runs diagonally in the middle of the knee. It prevents the tibia from sliding out in front of the femur, as well as provides rotational stability to the knee.

Description

About half of all injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament occur along with damage to other structures in the knee, such as articular cartilage, meniscus, or other ligaments.

Injured ligaments are considered "sprains" and are graded on a severity scale.

Grade 1 Sprains. The ligament is mildly damaged in a Grade 1 Sprain. It has been slightly stretched but is still able to help keep the knee joint stable.

Grade 2 Sprains. A Grade 2 Sprain stretches the ligament to the point where it becomes loose. This is often referred to as a partial tear of the ligament.

Grade 3 Sprains. This type of sprain is most commonly referred to as a complete tear of the ligament. The ligament has been split into two pieces, and the knee joint is unstable.

Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament are rare; most ACL injuries are complete or near-complete tears.

Cause

The anterior cruciate ligament can be injured in several ways:

  • Changing direction rapidly

  • Stopping suddenly

  • Slowing down while running

  • Landing from a jump incorrectly

  • Direct contact or collision, such as a football tackle

Several studies have shown that female athletes have a higher incidence of ACL injury than male athletes in certain sports. It has been proposed that this is due to differences in physical conditioning, muscular strength, and neuromuscular control. Other suggested causes include differences in pelvis and lower extremity (leg) alignment, increased looseness in ligaments, and the effects of estrogen on ligament properties.

Symptoms

When you injure your anterior cruciate ligament, you might hear a "popping" noise and you may feel your knee give out from under you. Other typical symptoms include:

  • Pain with swelling. Within 24 hours, your knee will swell. If ignored, the swelling and pain may resolve on its own. However, if you attempt to return to sports, your knee will probably be unstable and you risk causing further damage to the cushioning cartilage (meniscus) of your knee.

  • Loss of full range of motion

  • Tenderness along the joint line

  • Discomfort while walking

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL)